Main Characteristics

Length Over All: 40,60 meters

Maximum Beam: 10,89 meters

Maximum Draft: 3,50 meters

Cruise speed: 12 Knots

Maximum speed: 18 Knots

Range: 5.500 miles approximative at 9 Knots

Fuel Oil Capacity: 80.000 Liters

Freash Water Capacity:15.000 Liters.


High tensile steel AH 36 hull. ( Not all ships are built to an ice class. Building a ship to an ice class means that the hull must be thicker, and more scantlings must be in place. Sea chests may need to be arranged differently depending on the class. Sea bays may also be required to ensure that the sea chest does not become blocked with ice. Most of the stronger classes require several forms of rudder and propeller protection. Two rudder pintles are usually required, and strengthened propeller tips are often required in the stronger ice classes. More watertight bulkheads, in addition to those required by a ship's normal class, are usually required. In addition, heating arrangements for fuel tanks, ballast tanks, and other tanks vital to the ship's operation may also be required depending on the class.)

Light aluminium alloy 5083 H321/H 111 superstructures.

Double bottom tanks for fuel oil, freshwater, water ballast, sewage water, clean oil, dirty oil and sludge.

Engine and machinery foundations of ample strength and stiffness.

Ship’s voltage 400 Volt, 3 phase, 50 Hz.

Lighting system 230 Volt, AC, 50 Hz.

N. 1 MF/HF Sailor 6310 150 W DSC Class A SSB system

No. 1 Sperry Marine Enhanced CAT1 VisionMaster 250 ARPA X-Band Radar

No. 1 Sperry Marine Enhanced CAT2 VisionMaster 250 ARPA S-Band Radar

No.1 Sperry Marine mod. Vision Master FT ECDIS Station

No. 1 Sperry Marine VisionMaster FT Ancillaries

No. 1 UPS Eaton EX 3000 RT3U Marine Radar

No. 1 UPS Eaton EX 3000 RT3U Marine Radar

No. 1 Middle Atlantic Radar Rack

No. 1 Stein Sohn Bridge Navigational Watch Alarm System

No. 1 SAAB R4 DGPS Navigation System

No. 1 SAAB R4 Combined AIS/DGPS System

No. 1 Sperry Marine NAVIGAT X MK 1, mod. 10-24 VDC Gyrocompass

System

No. 1 Sperry Marine Overhead JUPITER w/180 mm Card System magnetic compass

No. 1 Sperry Marine 4000 Basic Heading Control System

No. 1 Sperry Marine Naviguide Steering System

No. 1 Sperry Marine mod. ES 5100 Single Frequency Echosounder

No. 1 Sperry Marine mod. Naviknot 350E NF Gate Valve Speedlog

No.1 B&G mod. H3000 Hydra Base Pack wind speed/direction system

No. 1 Sailor Class A 6222 w/DSC VHF System in the wheelhouse

No. 1 Sailor Class A 6222 w/DSC VHF System in the radio room

No. 1 Sailor Class D 6248 – 12 VDC VHF System in the crew mess

No. 1 Furuno NX700 Paperless Receiver - 12/24 VDC Navtex System

No. 1 Sailor Standard C 6110 Mini-C GMDSS System

No. 1 Sailor Ssas/Lrit TT6120 Mini C SSAS System

No. 2 Sailor SP3520 GMDSS portable VHF’s

: 1 Owner’s suite

2 Double bed cabins

2 twin bed cabins

: 1 Captain’s cabin

3 twin bed cabins


Polar Class Talking Mode

Application and Descriptions

Application

I1.1.1 The Unified Requirements for Polar Class ships apply to ships constructed of steel and intended for independent navigation in ice-infested polar waters. I1.1.2 Ships that comply with the UR I2 and UR I3 can be considered for a Polar Class notation as listed in Table 1. The requirements of UR I2 and UR I3 are in addition to the open water requirements of the Classification Society. If the hull and machinery are constructed such as to comply with the requirements of different Polar Classes, then both the hull and machinery are to be assigned the lower of these classes in the Certificate of Classification. Compliance of the hull or machinery with the requirements of a higher Polar Class is also to be indicated in the Certificate of Classification or equivalent. I1.1.3 Ships which are assigned a Polar Class notation and complying with the relevant requirements of UR I2 and UR I3 may be given the additional notation “Icebreaker”. “Icebreaker" refers to any ship having an operational profile that includes escort or ice management functions, having powering and dimensions that allow it to undertake aggressive operations in ice-covered waters. I1.1.4 For ships which are assigned a Polar Class notation, the hull form and propulsion power are to be such that the ship can operate independently and at continuous speed in a representative ice condition, as defined in Table 1 for the corresponding Polar Class. For ships and ship-shaped units which are intentionally not designed to operate independently in ice, such operational intent or limitations are to be explicitly stated in the Certificate of Classification or equivalent. I1.1.5 For ships which are assigned a Polar Class notation PC 1 through PC 5, bows with vertical sides, and bulbous bows are generally to be avoided. Bow angles should in general be within the range specified in I2.3.1 (v).


Note: 1. UR I1 applies to ships contracted for construction on or after 1 July 2007. 2. Rev.1 of this UR is to be uniformly applied by IACS Societies on ships contracted for construction on and after 1 March 2008. 3. Rev.2 of this UR is to be uniformly implemented by IACS Societies on ships contracted for construction on and after 1 July 2017. 4. The “contracted for construction” date means the date on which the contract to build the vessel is signed between the prospective owner and the shipbuilder. For further details regarding the date of “contract for construction”, refer to IACS Procedural Requirement (PR) No. 29.


I1.1.6 For ships which are assigned a Polar Class notation PC 6 and PC 7, and are designed with a bow with vertical sides or bulbous bows, operational limitations (restricted from intentional ramming) in design conditions are to be stated in the Certificate of Classification or equivalent.


I1.2 Polar Classes


I1.2.1 The Polar Class (PC) notations and descriptions are given in Table 1. It is the responsibility of the Owner to select an appropriate Polar Class. The descriptions in Table 1 are intended to guide owners, designers and administrations in selecting an appropriate Polar Class to match the requirements for the ship with its intended voyage or service. I1.2.2 The Polar Class notation is used throughout the Unified Requirements for Polar Class ships to convey the differences between classes with respect to operational capability and strength.


Table 1 - Polar Class descriptions

Polar Class Ice descriptions (based on WMO Sea Ice Nomenclature)

PC 1 Year-round operation in all polar waters

PC 2 Year-round operation in moderate multi-year ice conditions

PC 3 Year-round operation in second-year ice which may include multiyear ice inclusions.

PC 4 Year-round operation in thick first-year ice which may include old ice inclusions

PC 5 Year-round operation in medium first-year ice which may include old ice inclusions

PC 6 Summer/autumn operation in medium first-year ice which may include old ice inclusions

PC 7 Summer/autumn operation in thin first-year ice which may include old ice inclusions


I1.3 Upper and Lower Ice Waterlines I1.3.1 The upper and lower ice waterlines upon which the design of the ship has been based is to be indicated in the Certificate of Classification. The upper ice waterline (UIWL) is to be defined by the maximum draughts fore, amidships and aft. The lower ice waterline (LIWL) is to be defined by the minimum draughts fore, amidships and aft. I1.3.2 The lower ice waterline is to be determined with due regard to the ship’s ice-going capability in the ballast loading conditions. The propeller is to be fully submerged at the lower ice waterline.